De Angelis Ltd

Ateliers of Custom Upholstery & Fine Drapery

 
 

 

EST

1954


 

PHILOSOPHY
 

Custom Bespoke old world hands on upholstery is what we are known for. We give our clients free creative license to use our own designs or to new ones they have come up with. 

The experience is collaborative and in the end, each piece is uniquely your own.

 
 
 

THE SMALLEST

DETAIL MATTERS

THE MOST

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OUR TEAM

 
 Kayel leading the Drapery design
 
 KristineUpholstery Leas-ion
 
 Behind the sences
 
 The Masters
 

Custom Bespoke old world hands on upholstery

 
 
 

Design Styles

With the years of making the finest Upholstery we have an extensive collection of styles to use or draw inspiration from.

NY

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made

 

Quintessential Drapery

 

Just the sound of Drapery brings to mind the soft flowing fabric - we take very special pride in the way we make our drapes.

there are 5 layers that go into one panel of drapery - hand sewn hems as it were an elegant dress or a finely tailored suit.

 
 

BRICK AND MORTAR

 
 

516.723.3101

262Glen Head Road

Glen Head,ny 11545
U.S.A.

 
 
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Once know as the Gold Coast now known as the North Shore

Beginning in the early 1890s, lavish private estates were erected on what became known as the "Gold Coast" of Long Island. In all, over 500 mansions were built during this spree, concentrated in 70 square miles. The greatest architects, landscapers, decorators and firms were employed, including Stanford White, John Russell Pope, Guy Lowell, and Carrère and Hastings. Architectural styles included English Tudor, French Chateau, Georgian, Gothic, Mediterranean, Norman, Roman, Spanish, and combinations of these.

Only about 200 survive. As fortunes faded some of the largest or most prominent Gilded Era showpieces, such as Castle Gould (known as Hempstead House under the ownership of Daniel Guggenheim) in Sands Point, Theodore Roosevelt's Sagamore Hill, the Vanderbilt Museum, the Alexander P. de Seversky Mansion, Oheka Castle, and Old Westbury Gardens were turned into museum homes, conference centers, and resorts. Others repurposed for non-residential uses include Herbert L. Pratt's Glen Cove country home, "The Braes", turned into the Webb Institute, and U.S. Steel heir Childs Frick's "Clayton" the Nassau County Museum of Art.